In nearly all the attacks the aggressor chooses his victim, he may even do his research on the victim for days or even weeks at a time, following them, taking notes of timings where you have been and going too, when specifically picking him or her out of the crowd. Obviously, the attacker doesn’t search for the meanest, biggest, hardest looking person to start a fight with. No person of course not. He is not going to start a fight if he thinks he’ll end up being beaten. What the attackers look for is an easy target.

An easy target is not necessarily a big attacker against a smaller or weaker appearing opponent, but also anyone who isn’t aware of his surroundings such as a tourist or a female pushing her child in a pram or push chair. Even a well trained combatant caught off guard is an easy target.

In training, people usually prepare for the worst case scenario, after the attack already started, while they forget about avoidance i.e. avoid the area; avoid the situation/threat, something much easier than actually fighting. Prevention training knows how to have the right mind set when outside, keeping both eyes open, being aware of the situation, and your surrounding area. Also reading peoples body language quickly helps prevent violent confrontation which falls in to the same category as avoidance.

Being switched on and alert will also boost a person’s self confidence and as a consequence will project to his surroundings a “don’t mess with me” signal, a sign those potential attackers could detect from far away, and move on. Being a hard target in most cases would prevent the attack from ever happening in the first place.

But if you do become the victim you win or lose the aggressive assault it doesn’t stop there. At the time or shortly afterwards, you still have the psychological aspect of it which can stay in your mind, which may even change your life and the way you think?